Multidimensional Focus on Linguistic Landscape at Tourist Places: A Case Study of Mumbai

Authors

  • Priyanka Shukla Research Scholar, Department of Linguistics North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong, India ,North-Eastern Hill University
  • Dr. Amit Kumar Chandrana Assistant Professor, Department of English SRS Sanskrit Vishwa Vidya Pratisthan, Ramauli, Darbhanga (Bihar), India

Keywords:

Communication Tool (CT), Tourism Development (TD), Linguistic Landscape (LL), Quantitative Research (QR), Secondary Data (SD)

Abstract

Tourism and language are closely related. A language not only serves as a Communication Tool (CT) between hosts and guests but also can be developed into tourist attractions. Tourism Development (TD) has proved to have important impacts on languages. The present study attempts to fill this gap by investing the impacts of tourism on the Hindi, English and Marathi language in Mumbai, one of the most famous tourism destinations in India.  Hindi seems to be widely used at public places. Linguistic Landscape (LL) refers to the written languages used in public spaces, such as road signs, warning signs, private business signs, etc. Linguistic Landscape (LL) analysis has become the central theme of this study.

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References

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Published

2018-06-30

How to Cite

Priyanka Shukla, & Dr. Amit Kumar Chandrana. (2018). Multidimensional Focus on Linguistic Landscape at Tourist Places: A Case Study of Mumbai. The Creative Launcher, 3(2), 6–19. Retrieved from https://www.thecreativelauncher.com/index.php/tcl/article/view/345

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