The Dominance of Power in The Fire and the Rain

Authors

  • G. Sankar Assistant Professor, Department of English, SVS College of Engineering Combatore-Tamilnadu, India -641032.

Keywords:

Dominance, Sacrifice, Tribals, Tradition, Folk theatre

Abstract

The play The Fire and the Rain occurs in a small region of India long ago that has experienced a lack of rain for ten years. The king proposed to propitiate the Gods through fire sacrifice. So that God would be pleased and send rain to the parched land. In this fire sacrifice Paravasu the son of a learned Brahmin Raibhya, was appointed as the Chief Priest. And the play deals with this appointment and the disappointments of certain other characters. One disappointment definitely with reference to the father going by ancient Indian tradition, a lot of emphasis was put on age seniority i.e. age has always been respected. Older people have always been considered wiser because of their wider experience. Going by this tradition the learned Raibhya should have been appointed as the chief Priest but for practical reasons longevity of life span, the King chose to appoint Paravasu, the elder son as the Chief Priest. This appointment had disappointed and agonized the senior. The high priest of the temple, Paravasu is eager to perform a ceremony to bring rain.

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Published

2016-04-30

How to Cite

G. Sankar. (2016). The Dominance of Power in The Fire and the Rain. The Creative Launcher, 1(1), 30–44. Retrieved from https://www.thecreativelauncher.com/index.php/tcl/article/view/353

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